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File #: 22-491    Version: 1
Type: Resolution Status: Agenda Ready
File created: 3/3/2022 In control: Board of Supervisors
On agenda: 3/8/2022 Final action:
Title: County Executive Officer, acting as the Director of Emergency Services, requests adoption of a Resolution declaring a State of Local Emergency due to the 2021-2022 Drought.
Attachments: 1. Resolution
Date Ver.Action ByActionResultAction DetailsMeeting DetailsVideo
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TO:                     Board of Supervisors

 

FROM:                     Minh C. Tran - County Executive Officer

 

REPORT BY:                     Kendra Bowyer - Emergency Services Officer

 

SUBJECT:                     Adoption of a Resolution Proclaiming a Local Emergency Resulting from Drought Conditions

 

RECOMMENDATION

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County Executive Officer, acting as the Director of Emergency Services, requests adoption of a Resolution declaring a State of Local Emergency due to the 2021-2022 Drought.

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

On May 10, 2021, the Governor of the State of California proclaimed a State of Emergency across many counties, including Napa County, due to extremely low reservoir levels and drought conditions. On October 19, 2021, the Governor expanded the drought emergency statewide.

This potentially historic drought in Napa County may result in broad impacts and considerations that extend beyond drinking water and conservation efforts. The local agricultural system, general county operational practices, tourism, fire services and prevention, maintenance of environmental health, protection of vulnerable ecosystems, and consideration of the public’s health are all important aspects of the County’s drought response.

In June 2021, the Board of Supervisors adopted a resolution declaring a State of Local Emergency due to the adverse environmental, economic, health, welfare and social impacts these drought conditions pose to the people, businesses, agriculture, property, communities, the environment, wildlife, and recreation in the County of Napa. The resolution has since lapsed, today’s action will proclaim the State of Local Emergency again as conditions, and adverse impacts have persisted due to the lack of rainfall.

 

 

FISCAL & STRATEGIC PLAN IMPACT

 

 

Is there a Fiscal Impact?

Yes

Is it currently budgeted?

No

Where is it budgeted?

If costs are incurred as a result of the drought staff will return to the Board with any appropriation increases.

Is it Mandatory or Discretionary?

Discretionary

Is the general fund affected?

No

Future fiscal impact:

Ongoing drought conditions and related emergency response actions may result in future fiscal impacts to the County. Drought cycles historically last for several years.

Consequences if not approved:

If the resolution is not adopted the County will not be eligible for emergency response funding.

County Strategic Plan pillar addressed:

Healthy, Safe, and Welcoming Place to Live, Work, and Visit

 

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINATION: The proposed action is not a project as defined by 14 California Code of Regulations 15378 (State CEQA Guidelines) and therefore CEQA is not applicable.

 

 

BACKGROUND AND DISCUSSION

Napa County, as well as California as a whole, is in the second consecutive year of extremely dry conditions due to historically low rainfall totals, with the region looking at 37% to 40% of average for the water year. The U.S. Drought Monitor data from the National Drought Mitigation Center currently classifies Napa County at the “D2-Severe Drought” level.

During the existence of this local emergency, the powers, functions and duties of the Director of Emergency Services and the emergency organization of the County shall be those prescribed by state law, and by ordinance and resolutions of this County, approved by the Board of Supervisors.

In June 2021, the Board of Supervisors adopted a resolution declaring a State of Local Emergency due to the adverse environmental, economic, health, welfare and social impacts these drought conditions pose to the people, businesses, agriculture, property, communities, the environment, wildlife, and recreation in the County of Napa. The resolution has since lapsed, today’s action will proclaim the State of Local Emergency again as conditions, and adverse impacts have persisted due to the lack of rainfall.

The attached Resolution proclaiming a Local Emergency due to drought conditions covers the entire Napa County Operational Area, including all municipalities and special districts. Under California’s Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS), the County will serve as the lead agency for mutual aid and coordination with these jurisdictions and the State through the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services. With this proclamation, additional coordination at the Operational Area will occur to help identify what actions and resources are needed to address broad community impacts, particularly to local agriculture.

The proclamation creates a greater suite of opportunities to support the region’s local agriculture and economy. For example, additional funding requests for drought related response activities and public outreach may become available that can assist the agricultural community, mitigate the increased fire risk, and streamline mitigation projects to protect and preserve drinking and agricultural water supplies.

On March 5, 2021, the Secretary of the United States Department of Agriculture designated 50 California counties, including Napa County, as primary natural disaster areas due to drought. This Secretarial disaster designation makes farm operators eligible to be considered for certain assistance from the Farm Service Agency.

Although Napa County experienced significant rainfall in late 2021, according to the National Integrated Drought Information System (drought.gov), January 2022 was the eighth driest January on record in Napa County over the last 128 years and Napa County is still experiencing “severe drought.” By proclaiming a local emergency, the County is taking a pro-active approach to address drought-related impacts. The California Emergency Services Act, Government Code Section 8630 requires the Board of Supervisors review the status of the emergency at least once every 60 days until the governing body terminates the local emergency.